In 2008, I took a 30-day vegetarian challenge. That thirty days turned into a long-term commitment lasting to, and likely to extend beyond, the present moment.

Vegetarianism led to my learning how to cook. I suddenly found joy in the culinary arts (if my feeble attempts can be called as much) and began to value the variety of plants and fresh herbs available to me at local markets. In addition to learning how to cook, vegetarianism also led me to more a sustainable lifestyle. According to the journal Science, while meat and dairy provide just 18% of calories and 37% of protein, it uses the vast majority – 83% – of farmland and produces 60% of agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions. I was delighted when I learned that my new diet reduced my carbon footprint. This inspired me to create the series you see here, plant-based foods in their most raw forms, gathered from local markets, farmer’s markets, and gardens, and bathed in natural light.

This is an ongoing project.

 

Prints and copy rights are available for purchase. 

In 2008, I took a 30-day vegetarian challenge. That thirty days turned into a long-term commitment lasting to, and likely to extend beyond, the present moment.

Vegetarianism led to my learning how to cook. I suddenly found joy in the culinary arts (if my feeble attempts can be called as much) and began to value the variety of plants and fresh herbs available to me at local markets. In addition to learning how to cook, vegetarianism also led me to more a sustainable lifestyle. According to the journal Science, while meat and dairy provide just 18% of calories and 37% of protein, it uses the vast majority – 83% – of farmland and produces 60% of agriculture’s greenhouse gas emissions. I was delighted when I learned that my new diet reduced my carbon footprint. This inspired me to create the series you see here, plant-based foods in their most raw forms, gathered from local markets, farmer’s markets, and gardens, and bathed in natural light.

This is an ongoing project.

 

Prints and copy rights are available for purchase. 

A study on married life, Pragma is a series of environmental portraits of my husband and I.

In the 1970s, psychologist John A. Lee coined 6 different love styles: Eros, Ludus, Storge, Pragma, Mania, and Agape. After careful examination and fun online quizzes, it was determined that the love style my husband and I share is Pragma, thus the title of this series.

With pragma love, the costs and benefits are carefully weighed before entering into the relationship. It is non-emotional and based on certain criteria like education level, religious beliefs, and social status. Sounds cold, doesn’t it? I assure you, there is much love and fun in our relationship. A pragmatic love attitude is simply careful and cares about compatibility.

This is an ongoing project.

A study on married life, Pragma is a series of environmental portraits of my husband and I.

In the 1970s, psychologist John A. Lee coined 6 different love styles: Eros, Ludus, Storge, Pragma, Mania, and Agape. After careful examination and fun online quizzes, it was determined that the love style my husband and I share is Pragma, thus the title of this series.

With pragma love, the costs and benefits are carefully weighed before entering into the relationship. It is non-emotional and based on certain criteria like education level, religious beliefs, and social status. Sounds cold, doesn’t it? I assure you, there is much love and fun in our relationship. A pragmatic love attitude is simply careful and cares about compatibility.

This is an ongoing project.

We all lose inspiration from time to time. This series includes many images when I feel defeated from the ups and downs of life. There are many times I see a pocket of light with no one and nothing to put in it, so I use myself as a subject.

This is an ongoing project

We all lose inspiration from time to time. This series includes many images when I feel defeated from the ups and downs of life. There are many times I see a pocket of light with no one and nothing to put in it, so I use myself as a subject.

This is an ongoing project

Religion played a major role in my youth. While my father himself was not very religious, his family was very devout Catholic. My great uncle was a bishop, my great aunt a nun, a distant cousin a nun. Our Christmas and Thanksgiving family gatherings were never without a family mass conducted by my great uncle, the bishop. I hated these lengthy, seemingly cold, masses and feel this may be in part due to the influence of religion on my mother’s side.

My parents divorced when I was around 3, and my mother found her solace in the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses and she raised her children to be such.

As many others who experience religion, I was briefly a bit of a fanatic, then eventually an atheist, and more recently, rediscovering spirituality with more of a Sufism view.

This series is an exploration into spirituality in all different forms. It is meant to show that religions and religious practices, while seemingly very different, are not, inherently, all that different. All have the same end goal: to bring one closer to the divine by losing site of the ego and igniting compassion.

This is an ongoing series in its very early stages of development.

Religion played a major role in my youth. While my father himself was not very religious, his family was very devout Catholic. My great uncle was a bishop, my great aunt a nun, a distant cousin a nun. Our Christmas and Thanksgiving family gatherings were never without a family mass conducted by my great uncle, the bishop. I hated these lengthy, seemingly cold, masses and feel this may be in part due to the influence of religion on my mother’s side.

My parents divorced when I was around 3, and my mother found her solace in the Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses and she raised her children to be such.

As many others who experience religion, I was briefly a bit of a fanatic, then eventually an atheist, and more recently, rediscovering spirituality with more of a Sufism view.

This series is an exploration into spirituality in all different forms. It is meant to show that religions and religious practices, while seemingly very different, are not, inherently, all that different. All have the same end goal: to bring one closer to the divine by losing site of the ego and igniting compassion.

This is an ongoing series in its very early stages of development.